Lab Girl Author to Headline Omaha Public Library Fundraiser

Meet New York Times-bestselling author Hope Jahren on Tuesday, September 19, 2017, when the Omaha Public Library Foundation welcomes the Lab Girl author to Omaha. The evening fundraiser will be held at the Institute for Culinary Arts Building on the Metropolitan Community College Fort Omaha Campus.

Patron tickets are available for $100, which includes valet parking and a private reception with the author beginning at 5:30 p.m. 

For more information or to purchase tickets by phone, please contact the Omaha Public Library Foundation: foundation@omahalibrary.org or (402) 444-4589.

A number of sponsorship levels are also available. Event proceeds will benefit Omaha Public Library programs and services.

Thank you to our generous sponsors

Chancellor
Claire M. Hubbard Foundation
Allan and Dianne Lozier

Dean
Amy Haddad and Steve Martin
Mike and Susan Lebens
Mike and Dana Meyer
NP Dodge
Tenaska

Professor
StrategicHealthSolutions

Associate Professor
Alvine Engineering
Cline Williams
Deloitte
First National Bank
Streck

Research Associate
Alley Poyner Macchietto Architecture
Mutual of Omaha
Fraser Stryker
Paul and Annette Smith
RDG Planning and Design
Scott and Julie Cobb
The Reader
Security National Bank
Valmont

Hope Jahren: Science’s great communicator (TIME, April 21, 2016)

It is a rare breed of scientist who is both a leader in her field and a great writer, but Hope Jahren is both. A tenured professor at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, Jahren has built a career and a reputation in science by unearthing secrets hidden in fossilized plant life. Her work has resulted in at least 70 studies in dozens of journals, but it’s also given her a platform—a megaphone, really—to talk about something else: widespread sexual harassment and discrimination in science. On her blog, in op-eds and in her new memoir, Lab Girl, which debuted on the New York Times best-seller list, Jahren wields her influence to call out a culture that has caused women to flee the field she so loves. That’s why she does it: she loves science. And whether she’s writing about lab funding, discrimination or deciduous trees, she has a way of making you love it too.